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5-MeO-DMT Oxalate (CANADA ONLY) - Limited Stock

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5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine Oxalate

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5-MeO-DMT Oxalate

5-Methoxy-DMT/ 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine) Oxalate  , 2-(5-Methoxy-1H-indol-3-yl)-N,N-dimethylethan-2-amine Oxalate

NOTE: We only ship this product to Canada

Molecular Formula: C13H18N2O (C15H20H2O5 with oxalate)

Molecular Weight:218.29 g/mol  (308.33 g/mol with oxalate)

Form: Oxalate salt

IUPAC: 2-(5-Methoxy-1H-indol-3-yl)-N,N-dimethylethan-2-amine

CAS:  1019-45-0

Material Data Safety Sheet: Available upon request

NMR: Available upon request

LCMS: Available upon request

Additional Information

The serotonergic hallucinogen 5-Methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine disrupts cortical activity in a regionally-selective manner via 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors, October 2015, Neuropharmacology 101, DOI 10.1016/j.neuropharm.2015.10.016
Abstract:
5-Methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT) is a natural hallucinogen, acting as a non-selective serotonin 5-HT1A/5-HT2A-R agonist. Psychotomimetic agents such as the non-competitive NMDA-R antagonist phencyclidine and serotonergic hallucinogens (DOI and 5-MeO-DMT) disrupt cortical synchrony in the low frequency range (<4 Hz) in rat prefrontal cortex (PFC), an effect reversed by antipsychotic drugs. Here we extend these observations by examining the effect of 5-MeO-DMT on low frequency cortical oscillations (LFCO, <4 Hz) in PFC, visual (V1), somatosensory (S1) and auditory (Au1) cortices, as well as the dependence of these effects on 5-HT1A-R and 5-HT2A-R, using wild type (WT) and 5-HT2A-R knockout (KO2A) anesthetized mice. 5-MeO-DMT reduced LFCO in the PFC of WT and KO2A mice. The effect in KO2A mice was fully prevented by the 5-HT1A-R antagonist WAY-100635. Systemic and local 5-MeO-DMT reduced 5-HT release in PFC mainly via 5-HT1A-R. Moreover, 5-MeO-DMT reduced LFCO in S1, Au1 and V1 of WT mice and only in V1 of KO2A mice, suggesting the involvement of 5-HT1A-R activation in the 5-MeO-DMT-induced disruption of V1 activity. In addition, antipsychotic drugs reversed 5-MeO-DMT effects in WT mice. The present results suggest that the hallucinogen action of 5-MeO-DMT is mediated by simultaneous alterations of the activity of sensory (S1, Au1, V1) and associative (PFC) cortical areas, also supporting a role of 5-HT1A-R stimulation in V1 and PFC, in addition to the well-known action on 5-HT2A-R. Moreover, the reversal by antipsychotic drugs of 5-MeO-DMT effects adds to previous literature supporting the usefulness of the present model in antipsychotic drug development.
The natural hallucinogen 5-MeO-DMT, component of Ayahuasca, disrupts cortical function in rats: Reversal by antipsychotic drugs, March 2014  The International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology 17(08):1-14, DOI 10.1017/S1461145714000261 (FULL TEXT AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST)
Abstract:
5-Methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT) is a natural hallucinogen component of Ayahuasca, an Amazonian beverage traditionally used for ritual, religious and healing purposes that is being increasingly used for recreational purposes in US and Europe. 5MeO-DMT is of potential interest for schizophrenia research owing to its hallucinogenic properties. Two other psychotomimetic agents, phencyclidine and 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodo-phenylisopropylamine (DOI), markedly disrupt neuronal activity and reduce the power of low frequency cortical oscillations (<4 Hz, LFCO) in rodent medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Here we examined the effect of 5-MeO-DMT on cortical function and its potential reversal by antipsychotic drugs. Moreover, regional brain activity was assessed by blood-oxygen level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). 5-MeO-DMT disrupted mPFC activity, increasing and decreasing the discharge of 51 and 35% of the recorded pyramidal neurons, and reducing (-31%) the power of LFCO. The latter effect depended on 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptor activation and was reversed by haloperidol, clozapine, risperidone, and the mGlu2/3 agonist LY379268. Likewise, 5-MeO-DMT decreased BOLD responses in visual cortex (V1) and mPFC. The disruption of cortical activity induced by 5-MeO-DMT resembles that produced by phencyclidine and DOI. This, together with the reversal by antipsychotic drugs, suggests that the observed cortical alterations are related to the psychotomimetic action of 5-MeO-DMT. Overall, the present model may help to understand the neurobiological basis of hallucinations and to identify new targets in antipsychotic drug development.
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